Tuesday, February 11, 2014

How Black History Month Started

Black History Month was started primarily by a man named Carter G. Woodson.  He was a teacher and was the second African American man to obtain a doctorate from Harvard University.  In 1915, he attended a celebration in Chicago that celebrated 50 years of slavery ending.  This celebration had a huge impact on Woodson and he and four other men formed the ASNLH (Association for the Study of Negro Life and History).  This association went on to publish the Journal of Negro History.  

Woodson did not feel that the books used in schools at the time showed the history and achievements of African Americans.  He wanted a way to promote this history and to educate people on it.  So in 1926, he proposed the idea of "Negro History Week."  He chose the second week in February because it held birthdays for two very significant people in the fight for African Americans: Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.  This idea caught on fairly quickly and the ASNLH started publishing materials to give schools to help with lesson plans to promote the week.  In 1937, the ASNLH began publishing Negro History Bulletin which focused on materials for a theme for Negro History Week.  To this day, there is still a theme for each year.  This year's theme is Civil Rights in America.  

Fifty years after the first celebration, in 1976, Black History Week was transformed into Black History Month.  It is now celebrated for the whole month of February.  Woodson thought that the celebrations would eventually end but not the teachings of Black History Month.  He would probably like to know that in this instance he was proved wrong.  Celebrations around the country are still continued for the month of February.  



Carter G. Woodson


Sources:

Saturday, April 20, 2013

Meet the Librarian: Phineas Phoenix


We are posting daily "Meet the Librarian" profiles to celebrate National Library Week. Along with information about his or her job duties, we also thought it would be fun to ask some offbeat questions so readers could get to know each librarian's personality.

Here is our profile of Phineas Phoenix, Official Library Logo.

Phineas Phoenix has been the Official Library Logo of the Vise Library since 2009. He was designed by Art Instructor, Margie Monde and is used to represent the library on social media and informal communications. On formal library communications and library promotional materials, his counterpart, Fancy Phineas (also designed by Professor Monde) is used.


A few questions for Phineas: 

If you won the lottery, what is the first thing you would do?
Expand the library- more computers, more study spaces, maybe a small coffee shop (phoenixes like their caffeine), and pictures of me...everywhere. 

If you could be any fictional character (from a TV, movie, or book), who would you choose?
Definitely Fawkes from the Harry Potter series.

What grown-up job did you want to have when you were a child?
Mayor of the city of Phoenix, Arizona. Wouldn’t it be great to have a phoenix in charge of Phoenix?

If you were a criminal master mind, what would be your criminal racket? 
Arson. I’m already a bit of a self-contained arsonist anyway, so no one would ever figure out how the fires got started 

What do you have an irrational fear of?
Someone throwing a bucket of water on me when I’m trying to catch on fire and rise from the ashes

What word do you have trouble saying?
I don’t say words that I can’t pronounce.

What was the last book you read? 
 The Phoenix Rising: The Sesquicentennial History of Cumberland University, 1842-1992.

What book can you read over and over again?
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. 

What is the thing you like best about your work?
I like letting people know what’s going on in the library.

What do you do when you cannot sleep?
I rarely sleep, so this is not a problem for me.

What are you always late for?
Nothing. Phoenixes are extremely punctual.

What are you grateful for today?
Being alive and well! 

What are the perks of your job?
Getting to know what’s going on around campus through social media, sharing news about the library, and giving out prizes to the monthly library trivia winners.

Thanks Phineas, and thanks to everyone who read all of our postings this week. We hope that you enjoyed learning more about your library and librarians.




 

Friday, April 19, 2013

Meet the Librarian: Ashli Thomas

We are posting daily "Meet the Librarian" profiles to celebrate National Library Week. Along with information about his or her job duties, we also thought it would be fun to ask some offbeat questions so readers could get to know each librarian's personality. 

Here is our profile of Ashli Thomas, Library Assistant.


Ashli has worked at the Vise Library since December 2011. Her primary duties include handling Interlibrary Loan (ILL) requests, tracking overdue items, and posting content on the library's social media accounts. 

A few questions for Ashli:

If you won the lottery, what is the first thing you would do?  
Be super lame and pay off my school loans and then go on vacation somewhere! 

If you could be any fictional character (from a TV, movie, or book), who would you choose?
I think Elaine from Seinfeld, even if she couldn't dance, she still seemed to have some good laughs everyday.
  
What grown-up job did you want to have when you were a child?
I wanted to be a veterinarian.  
  
In what way are you superstitious?
Anytime I run in a race I eat the same thing.  I don't think that's me being superstitious, just knowing what works for me!

What do you have an irrational fear of?
I don't like people or clothes touching my neck.  Don't even try it or I might karate chop you!  

What word do you have trouble saying?
Galoshes.  I can't ever decide if it has an r on the end when I say it or the -es.  Clearly there is no "r" in this word, but I have to think about it.

What was the last book you read?
I usually read quite a bit, but I read a book that was terrible and it scarred me I think!  I haven't read much since I finished that book.  I have several checked out right now that I really need to get started on!

What is your favorite way to spend a Saturday? Run, maybe cook (since I ran! haha) and spend time with good friends/family.

What book can you read over and over again? Persuasion by Jane Austen, any of the Harry Potter books, and any book by Emily Giffin.  

What is the thing you like best about your work? I really enjoy doing interlibrary loan requests.  I always find it interesting what people request from us and what we request from other people!  I also really enjoy seeing what new issues of magazines we have received.  

What do you do when you cannot sleep? Think about how I wish I could sleep.  Which never helps.

What are you always late for?  
I'm pretty much early to everything. :)

If you were a police officer for one day what would you do with the authority? Ride around with the sirens turned on.  That might get old after awhile though...

What are you grateful for today?
The beautiful sunshine!  The sun has not been out in months it feels like.  It's hard to be in a bad mood when the sun is shining so bright!
  
What are the perks of your job? 
I enjoy showing students how to search for books.  I also like the interacting with students and faculty.  Plus, I get to work with some great people (including you, Phineas!)

Thanks Ashli! Join us tomorrow for a profile of Phineas Phoenix, Official Library Logo

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Meet the Librarian: Amber McKee


We are posting daily "Meet the Librarian" profiles to celebrate National Library Week. Along with information about his or her job duties, we also thought it would be fun to ask some offbeat questions so readers could get to know each librarian's personality.

Here is our profile of Amber McKee, Reference and Instruction Librarian.

Amber has worked at the Vise Library since November 2007. Her primary job duties include managing the library's electronic resources, teaching library instruction sessions, and posting content on the library's social media accounts.

A few questions for Amber: 

If you won the lottery, what is the first thing you would do?
I’d like to say I’d do something responsible like paying off bills or tithe the winnings, but chances are, I’d go shopping before anything else...

What do you have an irrational fear of?
Crickets. I know they’re completely harmless, but there’s something about their legs and them jumping at me that freaks me out! 

What is your favorite way to spend a Saturday?
Sleeping in, going to the gym, shopping, church, date night.

What is the thing you like best about your work?
No two days are exactly alike!

What do you do when you cannot sleep?
Usually I’ll lay there and think about how tired I’m going to be the next day. I’m sure that doesn’t help me fall asleep any faster!

What are you always late for?
Not much anymore because my husband is so punctual that it’s starting to rub off on me!

What was the last book you read?
I can’t remember the name, but it was something about saving money grocery shopping; I live a really exciting life!

If you were a police officer for one day what would you do with the authority?
I’ve actually been on a police officer ride along before for an 8 hour shift. During the shift, we pulled a few people over, responded to a couple of calls, and did a lot of driving around. It was more tedious than I thought, and it wasn’t nearly as fun pulling people over as the officer did it more. So, all of that to say, I’m not really sure what I would do!

What are you grateful for today?
God, family, friends, health, and my job! =)

What are the perks of your job?
Getting to figure out new ways to help people in person and electronically, variety, new books/magazines (of course!)

Thanks Amber! Join us tomorrow for a profile of Ashli Thomas, Library Assistant.


 

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Meet the Librarian: Eloise Hitchcock

We are posting daily "Meet the Librarian" profiles to celebrate National Library Week. Along with information about his or her job duties, we also thought it would be fun to ask some offbeat questions so readers could get to know each librarian's personality. 

Here is our profile of Eloise Hitchcock, Library Director. 


Eloise has worked at the Vise Library since August 2007. Her interests include promoting library use and teaching students how to locate and evaluate information.

A few questions for Eloise:

If you won the lottery, what is the first thing you would do?
Pay bills
What grown-up job did you want to have when you were a child?
Librarian

If you were a criminal master mind, what would be your criminal racket?
Art thief


In what way are you superstitious?
Luck is an attitude


What word do you have trouble saying?
Wasps

What was the last book you read?
Caleb's Crossing by Geraldine Brooks


What is your favorite way to spend a Saturday?
At the Lake


What book can you read over and over again?
Harry Potter series

What is the thing you like best about your work?
Access to information

What do you do when you cannot sleep?
Think

What are you grateful for today?
Every breath

What are the perks of your job?
Learning   


Thanks Eloise! Join us tomorrow for a profile of Reference and Instruction Librarian, Amber McKee.

Monday, April 15, 2013

Meet the Librarian: Rick Brown

We are posting daily "Meet the Librarian" profiles to celebrate National Library Week. Along with information about his or her job duties, we also thought it would be fun to ask some offbeat questions so readers could get to know each librarian's personality. 

Here is our profile of Rick Brown, Library Technical Assistant.



Rick has worked at the Vise Library since January 2011. His primary job duties include ordering and cataloging library materials, maintaining the online catalog, handling course reserves, and designing promotion materials.

A few questions for Rick:

If you won the lottery, what is the first thing you would do?
Give half to charity and spend the rest building my long-delayed fortress of doom.

If you could be any fictional character (from a TV, movie, or book), who would you choose?

I don't know what character I might want to be, but I can tell you which one I wouldn't want to be: Henry Bemis in the Twilight Zone's "Time Enough at Last."

What grown-up job did you want to have when you were a child?
Author. I've yet to yield that ambition, in point of fact.

If you were a criminal master mind, what would be your criminal racket?
Book pirating -- but not online. No, I'd have literal shipments of "liberated" books in the holds of my antiquated pirate fleet, capturing new releases from publisher frigates with steel, shot, and obscenely sharp bookmarks. They'd call my flagship the Black Verso.

In what way are you superstitious?
Not really at all. But I do avoid ladders, because when you get right down to it, why would you walk under one anyway?

What do you have an irrational fear of?
Spiders--of any size really, but particularly the giant, fantastical kind.

What word do you have trouble saying?
"Solicitous." A pity, because the word is so useful.

What was the last book you read?
The Tower of Fear by Glen Cook (shortly after A Storm of Swords by George R. R. Martin).

What is your favorite way to spend a Saturday?
Reading and listening to film scores on LP.

What book can you read over and over again?
Dune by Frank Herbert. Richer with every reading. And if you can count series as well, The Black Company by Glen Cook.

What is the thing you like best about your work?
The ability to indulge my reverence for the written word in all its forms. There is a visceral satisfaction in handling books, but whether physical or electronic, information has a power all its own.

What do you do when you cannot sleep?
Read! A stereotypical answer for one in our field, but it's true.

What are you grateful for today?
Literacy. There is nothing that so cogently reminds you of literacy's benefits then being surrounded by information all day.

What are the perks of your job?
Among many other things: first dibs on new books!

Thanks Rick! Join us Wednesday for a profile of Library Director, Eloise Hitchcock

Sunday, April 14, 2013

A History of National Library Week and Vise Library

Today is the start of National Library Week, which is a week-long celebration of the contributions of our nation's libraries and librarians. National Library Week is also intended to promote library use and support, and for that reason, all types of libraries- public, school, special, and academic- participate each year. Each day for the rest of the week, we will feature a librarian profile to celebrate our librarians here at Cumberland University!

To kick off National Library Week, here is an excerpt from "A History of Vise Library" written by Eloise Hitchcock.

Cumberland University was founded in 1842 with programs in the liberal arts, law and theology. During the Civil War, the campus was destroyed by fire, but reopened in 1866 with a “resurgence from the ashes.” The first mention of the Library in the college catalogue was in the academic year, 1858-1859. Under the Law Library it states, “each student pays the University Treasurer $1, which admits him to the Law Library. The contingent fund thus created is expended to increase the number of books in the Library.” The Law Library was located in Caruthers Hall, known as the “Law Barn,” and contained 6,500 volumes of standard law books.

By 1873, a University Library is established containing over six thousand volumes. Additionally, it is noted: “The Reading Room is supplied with the leading periodicals in the English language. They constitute, under their present admirable arrangement, a new feature in the University, and afford great advantages.” In the next year the collection grew to 7,000 volumes as “several hundred books and a number of valuable maps have been added to the Library, by donation, since the last catalogue.” In 1882, the collection was 8,000 volumes, and in 1883 it is noted that the Library is “free to all students.” In 1887, the collection grew
to ten thousand volumes, and by 1889, twelve thousand volumes were in the collection.

In the 1897 catalogue, Mrs. E. J. Hale is recognized for her gift of $1,000.00 “for the purpose of furnishing a room in the new University building . . . to be known as the Hale Reference Library, the Departmental Library of the Seminary. “The room is conveniently situated, commodious, well-lighted, finished in oak, and superbly furnished with oak chairs, tables, librarian’s desk, beautiful shelving and costly carpeting.” It is also noted that there is a General Library in Caruthers Hall.

In 1901, the University Library collection had grown to 15,000 volumes. It was in this year that the University received two thousand dollars from Mr. David Earle Mitchell “for the equipment of a library adapted to the special needs of the Literary department.” The Mitchell Library was established and occupied “a large and well-lighted room on the first floor of the University building, and thus is within easy reach of all students. It is handsomely equipped with sectional bookcases, elegant tables, and a cabinet mantel, etc. and at present contains some two thousand one hundred volumes.” During this time Cumberland housed four departmental libraries including the University Library, Hale Reference Library of Theology, the Law Library, and the Mitchell Library. A newly renovated Law Library opened in 1903 containing 3,000 volumes.

In October of 1989 a new library building opened its doors on campus. It is named the Doris & Harry Vise Library after its principle benefactor Harry Vise, founder of the Texas Boot Company and a Trustee Emeritus of the University. Mr. Vise, who currently lives in Nashville, is a Jewish immigrant who barely escaped Nazi Germany in 1939. Shortly after its construction, the building was selected as a winner of the Middle Tennessee Excellence in Development Award.

The Library is 18,000-square-feet and houses meeting rooms and study areas, computer and audio-visual facilities, the University Archives, and special collections in Tennessee History, Nobel Laureates, Women’s Studies, and Children’s and Young Adult Literature. The current collection [in 2010] consists of 35,000 volumes and an additional 35,000 e-books, as well as access to over 42,000 journals available through more than seventy-two full text online databases.

To read it in its entirety, check out the Spring 2010 issue of the Vise Connection newsletter, and be sure to visit tomorrow for a profile of Library Technical Assistant, Rick Brown.